A Flag of Our Own

"I am just wanting people to progress their thinking about who we are as a nation in a modern and fast changing world and the pressing need to formalise that in our own unique flag"

Welcome!

I created this web site to communicate my concern for what I see as Australia’s lack of a strong, unified and independent sense of national identity.

 This is evidenced by our apparent inability to cut our symbolic ties with mother England by retaining an outdated and obsolete national flag.

I hope the website can progress the thinking of ordinary Australians on the need for a new national flag and to encourage them to start actively seeking alternatives to the current design.

My contribution to this process is to offer some design ideas of my own.

My flag designs all share the common theme of a traditional blue background overlaid by either an adaptation of the aboriginal flag or the three colours of the aboriginal flag with the white southern cross overlaying all the colours. Some designs also have a combined green and gold element as a symbol of reconciliation and unity.

  • The blue background and white Southern Cross of the current Australian flag are a direct link to our colonial past and current national identity with which most Australians can relate. The Commonwealth Star has been omitted (except Design 7) as it would not add significantly to either the symbolism or the aesthetics of the new designs.
  •  The Aboriginal flag and colours are treated with reverence by most progressive Australians and are integral to our future national identity.
    Our Indigenous peoples suffered greatly at the hands of the ‘white invaders’ and the defaced British Ensign is a direct link to those past colonial powers responsible for that suffering.

It is time to remove that link and give due respect and recognition to the original custodians of this great southern continent we now call Australia.

This is the key to our real national identity.

It is the ground under our feet that we now belong, the same ground that has been populated for millennia by our indigenous peoples, this is the ground and the continent we now share,
THIS IS WHO WE ARE.

"To survive in peace and harmony, united and strong,
we must have one people, one nation, one flag."

Pauline Hanson

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Design Notes

7.

In this design I have retained the Commonwealth Star and relocated it to the position previously occupied by the British Ensign. In Heraldry, the upper left hand corner of the flag (called the canton) is the position of honour. The implication is that since we are a sovereign independent nation our loyalty is to Australia, not to Britain, the Queen or any non-existent British Empire. This design has essentially just replaced the Union Jack with the colours of the Aboriginal flag but has rearranged the design elements in a way that tries to symbolise sovereign independence, reconciliation and national unity.
more   »»

6.

The latest design has been simplified by omitting the shared green and gold design elements. A good flag needs to be have the least number of design elements and still have the support of the majority of people it represents. In this design the southern cross has been moved to the centre as a symbol of unity for all Australians. This is my personal favourite, the strength of this design is it’s simplicity.
more   »»

5.

The sun of the aboriginal flag has been replaced by a narrow yellow band so that the flag background is now just a series of bands representing the combined colours of the Australian and Aboriginal flags plus the white southern cross. Also the yellow band helps avoid possible copyright issues with the designer of the aboriginal flag.
more   »»

4.

To avoid the stereotype of the jumping kangaroo as well as the similarity to the Qantas logo I have replaced the kangaroo with gum leaves and gum nuts. The gum tree is quintessentially Australian and most Australians can readily identify with this symbol. more   »»

3.

The yellow sun of the aboriginal flag is enlarged and shared with the contemporary Australian colours of green and gold in the form of a jumping kangaroo. The kangaroo is partially outside the yellow sun to the left suggesting the two design elements are independent of each other but are captured in the same frame. The offsetting of the kangaroo also gives the total flag design a more dynamic look and feel.
more   »»

2.

The blue background and white Southern Cross of the current Australian flag are retained. The Aboriginal flag is left largely intact and is stretched and overlaid on the blue background. The white Southern Cross remains in its original position overlaying the stretched black and red bands of the Aboriginal flag.  Relocating the yellow sun and omittting the green band added balance to the flag design. The Aboriginal flag and colours are treated with reverence by most progressive Australians and are integral to our future national identity.
more   »»

1.

The flag has four equal bands coloured green, the black and ochre red of the Aboriginal flag, and traditional blue of the current Australian flag.. The yellow sun of the Aboriginal flag is located in the top-right corner overlaying the green and black bands symbolising unity and reconciliation between indigenous and non-indigenous Australia. The white Southern Cross and the traditional blue band is the direct link to our colonial past and present nationhood with which most Australians can relate. The overlaying of the Southern Cross is a further symbol of national unity. The overlaying of the Southern Cross is a further symbol of national unity.
more   »»

It is the ground under our feet that we now belong, the same ground that has been populated for millennia by our indigenous peoples, this is the ground and the continent we now share,
this is who we are.

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Design 7
Design 6
Design 5
Design 4
Design 3
Design 2
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